Post number 2 on number 2s!

 
 

Parents often underestimate the advantages of including an educator in the potty training journey of their child.

 

Equally educators often undervalue the wealth of experience and clarity that they can offer too.

 

Every year an educator helps all of their munchkins progress in some way towards independent toileting. Together with consistency, open communication and a bit of fun your child can grow and enjoy their progression.

 
 

Three of my must do’s…

 

1. Wait until your child is showing signs of being ready

 

What are some of the signs?

Telling you they have a dirty nappy or need changing

Not wanting their nappy back on at change time

Showing interest in sitting on the potty/toilet.

 

2. Have a potty around

 

How will you know if your child is starting to show interest if there isn’t anything to show interest in? Children are often daunted by the toilet so the potty needs to be a familiar item to them not something scary and new.

Did you see my Pic above

– thats my Lach in the middle of a camp site

– all his own doing and he was very happy with himself 🙂

 

3. Start with consistency

 

At first, ASK your child if they would like to sit (just once). Try to keep this the same time every day i.e. before a bath, after lunch, after their nap time. Note that each of these times is when you would normally be changing their nappy anyway. Don’t try and reinvent the wheel just go with what is the natural flow of the day for your child.

 
 

Check out Simple Reflect – The Easiest Way to Document

 
 

Now my Three Bonus Tips…

 

1. Positive peer pressure

This can be your friend especially with young children who need to have fun. One of the ways to do that is by buddying them up with another toddler that is also ready.

 

2. Hi fives

Cheering and fun songs are more important than sticker charts. We have been on a journey so why do parents suddenly feel that journey needs things?

 

3. Before a child develops fear offer an ice block

What? Have you heard parents say “My child is potty trained for wee’s but don’t ask them to poo, that’s a different story.” I’m anti bribes and I’m anti food rewards absolutely but poo is scary to a toddler and needs lots of discussion. It takes time so an easy and fun way to introduce this is ‘Let’s have an ice block on the Potty!!’

 

What about tiny bubbas I hear you ask? Well yes, singing songs and encouraging positive interaction at changing time are the building blocks. Even just speaking clearly when checking a child’s nappy can help.

 

I’d love to hear about your tips or journey to potty training.

 

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Kathy